MMMM.. BRISKET..
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Catering, Vending and Cooking For The Masses. this forum is OnTopic. A resource to help with catering, vending and just cooking for large parties. Topics to include Getting Started, Ethics, Marketing, Catering resources, Formulas and recipes for cooking for large groups.


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Old 03-13-2020, 10:32 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ModelMaker View Post
Sounds to me like you want authentic Texas slow smoked brisket!
You and I both know how that's accomplished, the people will also know, so you have to pick one way.
One way is gonna get you "yeah that place is ok".
The other way has people waiting in line for you to open.
Ed
Sounds like I'm going to need a night shift huh???
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Old 03-13-2020, 10:37 AM   #17
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Sounds like I need to hire a night crew huh??
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Old 03-13-2020, 10:39 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by ModelMaker View Post
Sounds to me like you want authentic Texas slow smoked brisket!
You and I both know how that's accomplished, the people will also know, so you have to pick one way.
One way is gonna get you "yeah that place is ok".
The other way has people waiting in line for you to open.
Ed
Sounds like I need to hire a night crew huh?
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Old 03-13-2020, 10:44 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by ModelMaker View Post
Sounds to me like you want authentic Texas slow smoked brisket!
You and I both know how that's accomplished, the people will also know, so you have to pick one way.
One way is gonna get you "yeah that place is ok".
The other way has people waiting in line for you to open.
Ed
Sounds like I need to hire a night crew huh lol
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Old 03-13-2020, 10:45 AM   #20
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There are not any shortcuts to great smoked brisket.

Your not far from me, let me know what you end up doing, I’ll be happy to taste test too :)
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Old 03-13-2020, 10:48 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by JAKs Q & brew View Post
I'd also look into city regulations, especially given other local bbq joints dont smell on the street. It is possible there are regulations about venting smoke on to the street.
I appreciate this. It definitely has me thinking. They might just be lazy though.
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Old 03-13-2020, 11:15 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by marubozo View Post
You'll need $$$ but a southern pride or Ole Hickory or similar type smoker. I've been using them for 7 years now, and I cook brisket 14 hours overnight. You still get to use real wood, but you don't have to fuss with it every half hour all night long.

When I was between my two restaurants I got hired as executive chef at a place that wanted to start doing BBQ and their solution for brisket was to cook at 275 for about 5 hours and then finish in the oven rather than spend money on a good smoker. It was awful and needless to say I left there quickly.
Thanks for the reply. So at your restaurants you use a southern pride or ole hickory? You like the product just as if you were smoking on a offset?
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Old 03-13-2020, 11:17 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by SmoothBoarBBQ View Post
I would think something like the Myron Mixon rotisserie smokers would be the best way to go. They're stickburners with gas assist, so you can get that lovely stick burning aroma while you're there, and when you're ready to close up shop you can turn on the gas assist and it will keep your temps perfectly even all night long.

https://myronmixonsmokers.com/commer...serie-smokers/

https://youtu.be/egRaDB-7uP0

These smokers can also behave just like an Alto Sham and be holding boxes, so you don't need to have extra equipment or move your meat during the entire cooking process.

Good luck with your venture!
Thanks man. This is helpful. Do you have a BBQ joint?
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Old 03-13-2020, 11:21 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by e11even View Post
You can cook the brisket the day before for the next day, then put the brisket in a Cvap or alto shamm to hold the brisket overnight at safe temp. I use a Cvap for this. Also you could smoke it up until you wrap then finish in an oven. You can also look into smokers that allow you to step away. I have a J&R that can smoke for hours unattended and there are others that can do this as well like the ole hickory. You just need to make sure you have a big coal bed and throw on enough splits before you split for the night. Obviously you wont be able to walk away from a true offset stick burner. But you can still cook during the day and hold overnight for the next days service. Lots of places do this. Franklins is cooking his briskets during the day for the next days service. I think he pulls his at like 1am but you can start your cook earlier so you will be pulling them earlier.
This is helpful. When you say they are pulling briskets at 1 am how are they holding them for 12 hours? Can a cvap or alto shaam really hold food for that long safely? Do you have a BBQ joint that you do this in?
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Old 03-13-2020, 12:09 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OOMPDADDY View Post
Thanks for the reply. So at your restaurants you use a southern pride or ole hickory? You like the product just as if you were smoking on a offset?
Southern Prides. I've owned 4 of them so far. I also used a nice Sherley offset alongside the SPs at my original location. If you use a southern pride correctly, and use the same wood you're using in say a big offset, the end result is almost indistinguishable. On busy days I'd be serving brisket (and other meats) that come off the offset and SP and you really couldn't tell which was made on which.

Don't get me wrong, there are plenty of people making bad BBQ on rotisserie machines. Just like there are a lot of people making bad BBQ on old stick burners. So you still need to know what you're doing to some extent. But the beauty is you don't have to tend to a fire (oro hire someone you trust and have high labor costs) constantly.

If you have the space at your location to run offset pits, and you don't mind working the pits all day everyday yourself, or have the money to hire someone who can cook your level of BBQ for you, then that's certainly a good way to go. But if you want to do volume, or don't have the space that regular pits require (don't forget wood storage space), investing $15-20k in a commercial smoker will ultimately save you a lot of time and/or labor, save you a ton of space, and if done right, produce very consistent product.

There's no right or wrong answer, it just depends on what you want to do, what your physical location limitations are, and making the best of it.

For example, I'm now right downtown at this location and there's just no room for the Shirley or other pits at the restaurant. So, we built a platform and hoisted an SPK500 up on it at the back of the kitchen. Have to work with what ya got.
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Old 03-13-2020, 12:13 PM   #26
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This is helpful. When you say they are pulling briskets at 1 am how are they holding them for 12 hours? Can a cvap or alto shaam really hold food for that long safely? Do you have a BBQ joint that you do this in?
I use CVAPs for holding our meats. They work wonders and I have held meat that long in them (big cuts anyway). But you have to be careful because local health departments differ. In some cases they say hot food can only be held for 4 hours before being tossed. Granted, many places may skirt rules like this when it comes to BBQ, but if you have a strict health department, or a stickler inspector, they may nail you on it.

In my case, I load the smoker with brisket/butts at around 6pm every evening and they cook until about 8am the next morning. When I get in I pull the brisket and butt and reload with ribs/chicken/tips/sausage/etc. which cook in time to be done by lunch service at 11am. Then the smoker is used from 11-6 to continue to cook the shorter timed meats.
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Old 03-13-2020, 12:18 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by OOMPDADDY View Post
This is helpful. When you say they are pulling briskets at 1 am how are they holding them for 12 hours? Can a cvap or alto shaam really hold food for that long safely? Do you have a BBQ joint that you do this in?
Franklins takes the briskets off the smoker and allows them to cool down for an hour or so until they get down to probably 150-160 degrees and then puts them still wrapped in the butcher paper into a holding cabinet set at 145 degrees. They have two Vulcan cabinets behind the counter that they pull from for service. Not sure if there are more in back but he has said he uses Cvaps or Alto Shamms in interviews. And yes they will hold for 12+ hours. The Cvaps have a humidity control on them and thats what I use. They can keep food crispy or moist depending on the setting. I dont have a brick and mortar, I am just starting out and doing pop ups, events and catering a few days a month. So I will cook the brisket and pulled pork the day before and put the brisket and pork in the Cvap overnight to hold until I transport it to the event.
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Old 03-13-2020, 12:28 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by marubozo View Post
I use CVAPs for holding our meats. They work wonders and I have held meat that long in them (big cuts anyway). But you have to be careful because local health departments differ. In some cases they say hot food can only be held for 4 hours before being tossed. Granted, many places may skirt rules like this when it comes to BBQ, but if you have a strict health department, or a stickler inspector, they may nail you on it.

In my case, I load the smoker with brisket/butts at around 6pm every evening and they cook until about 8am the next morning. When I get in I pull the brisket and butt and reload with ribs/chicken/tips/sausage/etc. which cook in time to be done by lunch service at 11am. Then the smoker is used from 11-6 to continue to cook the shorter timed meats.

Just out of curiosity, How would they know if you held it at 4 or 12 hours? Would they seriously sit there and wait 4 + hours just to nail you on technicality? And unless nobody tended to it, how would they know if you pulled some out at 4 hours or put some in?
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Old 03-13-2020, 12:49 PM   #29
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Just out of curiosity, How would they know if you held it at 4 or 12 hours? Would they seriously sit there and wait 4 + hours just to nail you on technicality? And unless nobody tended to it, how would they know if you pulled some out at 4 hours or put some in?
Inspectors are generally smart people, many of whom have been in the industry before they got into this. If they know you're using one smoker and are cooking some meats for 12+ hours, they know that if you're serving brisket when you open at 11am and also at 8pm, and there's no brisket being cooked on your smoker during the day and it's full of other meats, it isn't hard to put two and two together.

I've met some who even required keeping logs for all the holding boxes recording what time meats were loaded, what temps they were at, when they were discarded, and all that.

But like I said, every jurisdiction is different, every inspector is different, and in some cases it isn't an issue at all. But you just have to prepare for the fact that they could really stick to hard and fast rules.
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Old 03-13-2020, 01:20 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by marubozo View Post
Inspectors are generally smart people, many of whom have been in the industry before they got into this. If they know you're using one smoker and are cooking some meats for 12+ hours, they know that if you're serving brisket when you open at 11am and also at 8pm, and there's no brisket being cooked on your smoker during the day and it's full of other meats, it isn't hard to put two and two together.

I've met some who even required keeping logs for all the holding boxes recording what time meats were loaded, what temps they were at, when they were discarded, and all that.

But like I said, every jurisdiction is different, every inspector is different, and in some cases it isn't an issue at all. But you just have to prepare for the fact that they could really stick to hard and fast rules.

Ok, maybe you have a shorter window since you open at lunch time. I was thinking more of a breakfast, lunch, and dinner restaurant.
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