The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS.

The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS. (https://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/index.php)
-   Q-talk (https://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=5)
-   -   Injecting Brisket (https://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=12721)

JudgeTex 07-25-2005 10:12 AM

Injecting Brisket
 
Seems wrong...

Saw some folks doing it on TV yesterday.

The_Kapn 07-25-2005 10:20 AM

Re: Injecting Brisket
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by JudgeTex
Seems wrong...

Saw some folks doing it on TV yesterday.

We "pump her full" of moisture and flavor.
Same with Boston Butts--we make those suckers look like a basket ball :lol:

Works wonderful :lol:

Get a 6oz Cajun Injector and try it!
World of difference.

TIM

Neil 07-25-2005 10:38 AM

RE: Re: Injecting Brisket
 
I've tried to inject brisket but it comes squirting out all over the place!

Quigley 07-25-2005 11:08 AM

RE: Re: Injecting Brisket
 
doesn't the needle leave a long track that would affect the apperence when you slice it?

The_Kapn 07-25-2005 11:18 AM

Re: RE: Re: Injecting Brisket
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Quigley
doesn't the needle leave a long track that would affect the apperence when you slice it?

Not a trace.
TIM

JudgeTex 07-25-2005 02:38 PM

Never had either one dry out on me. I get enough smoke on a brisket in the first couple of hours and it tends to seal all the juice in... plus that big layer of fat dripping through the S.O.B. doesn't hurt either.

Cuelio 07-25-2005 02:53 PM

Track marks on the meat . . . .

Reminds me of my old clients.

The_Kapn 07-25-2005 04:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JudgeTex
Never had either one dry out on me. I get enough smoke on a brisket in the first couple of hours and it tends to seal all the juice in... plus that big layer of fat dripping through the S.O.B. doesn't hurt either.

If you are happy with your results--that is great.
A lot of us cook fat cap down for some very good reasons and we like that.
Some of us inject for some very good reasons and we like those results also.

I would never call another cooks methods wrong.
Especially when the dudes putting out the info make a living cooking.
They are a lot better cooks than me and I listen intently when they advocate something. If it makes any sense at all, and is within my capability, I try it.
Make up my own mind--objectively.

No single right way to Que.
That is what makes it so much fun.

TIM

JudgeTex 07-25-2005 04:41 PM

[quote="kapndsl
If you are happy with your results--that is great.
A lot of us cook fat cap down for some very good reasons and we like that.
Some of us inject for some very good reasons and we like those results also.

I would never call another cooks methods wrong.
Especially when the dudes putting out the info make a living cooking.
They are a lot better cooks than me and I listen intently when they advocate something. If it makes any sense at all, and is within my capability, I try it.
Make up my own mind--objectively.

No single right way to Que.
That is what makes it so much fun.

TIM[/quote]

Scolding mod? Unreal. :roll:

Now back to BBQ:

Fat cap down?!?! Holy Mother of Pearl!!! Are you insane? <--Sarcasm mod. Don't get (re)bent out of shape.

That said, what are the very good reasons for fat cap down? Never tried it (and like injecting a brisket, probably never will) but I'm curious as to why it is done.

Also, while I am a Texas (6th generation) and very set in my ways, I have learned a lot from this site. (Putting meat in a cooler, for example -- I used to wrap it in a towel). That was the first time I had ever heard of injecting a brisket (turkey and hog, yes, but never a brisket--then again, the culprits weren't from "around here"). So I asked on this site (where a lot of folks here know what they're doing and others are learning) to find out how common the practice was. I expressed my opinion and stick by it. You expressed yours (essentially that I am an arse for expressing mine). I think I'm pretty cool. I like me. But differences of opinion make for good discussion. Otherwise we all just stand around nodding our heads.

God bless Texas and the other 49 states. :D

The_Kapn 07-25-2005 04:51 PM

Judge,
Not scolding and not irritated.
Ask Stacey how I am when I am either of those :lol:
You simply questioned the technique of others and do not seem really open to other methods.
That's all.

Quote:

That said, what are the very good reasons for fat cap down? Never tried it (and like injecting a brisket, probably never will) but I'm curious as to why it is done.
Fat Cap Up--trying to build bark on fat. Fat renders off of and drips around meat and can actually wash off some or all of the rub on the sides and bottom. It does not render through the meat but around it. Bottom bark side is on grates and exposed directly to higher heat.

Fat Cap Down--fat cushions meat from source of heat (normally coming up). Top bark is free to cook and develop.

Either way works fine--as I said your choice.
There are folks that actually "flip" the meat at the half-way point.
That is fine for them also.

TIM

parrothead 07-25-2005 11:41 PM

Yes, most of us do fat cap down now. Somewhere there is a link to a very detailed articla about this.

chad 07-25-2005 11:44 PM

Fat cap down. Ain't no way it "runs through the meat" and it acts as an insulator - not to mention you cut if off and throw it away so why bother to season it!

I like the "meat side" to be pretty much untouched during the cook so my bark stays intact.

However, it's not "wrong" to cook fat up. I just prefer the results I get with the fat side down.

thillin 07-26-2005 12:08 AM

Here is one previous thread:

http://bandera-brethren.com/index.ph...hlight=fat+cap

thillin 07-26-2005 12:16 AM

Here's the articleI think:

The following brisket article came from:

Bill Cannon

BBQ Made Simple

Real Texas BBQ Rub, Inc.

10701 Corporate Dr., Suite 295

Stafford, Texas 77477



BEEF BARBECUED BRISKET Ė A TEXAS TRADITION

I have received a lot of questions about brisket cooking in the last couple of months and since we have added so many new subscribers to the newsletter I thought the article we did on brisket cooking would be good for this month.

Hell, just thinking about cooking a brisket seems to scare some folks. We are going to make this process as easy as we know how to do. It is not hard to cook a great beef brisket. All it takes is time, patience, a great seasoning, cooking long, and cooking at low temperatures. That is it. Need we say more?

It has been said that the real measure of how good a BBQ cook you are can be measured by how good your beef brisket is.

This might hold true down here in TexasÖ. but in other states the same might be said about pork shoulders or pork butts or pork ribs.

But since I am a Texan we are going to start with Brisket. After all Texas is the beef capital of the World.

I get a few emails every month that ask questions about cooking brisket. Letís start with the basics and go forward.

Frequently Asked Questions Concerning Brisket Cooking

How do you choose a good brisket to cook?
Do I cook the brisket with the fat side up or down?
Should I wrap a brisket during the cooking process?
How long and at what temperature do I need to cook a brisket?
My brisket is burned or dried out, what happened?
Do you cook the flat the same as the entire brisket?
Do you mop your brisket when cooking?
How to slice the brisket?

1. How to Choose a Good Brisket to put on the Smoker.

You go into the meat section of the store and look for a good brisket to cook. What am I looking for in a brisket so I can pick out the best one to cook?

Generally speaking, you want to be able to pick up the brisket and fold it in half (or close to it). You want to be able to take the flat end (this is the narrow part of the brisket) and be able to touch the point end (this is the thickest part) of the brisket.

Pick a brisket that has a good color to it. It should be a good red color for the meat and a nice white color for the fat. Older briskets could have a yellowing of the fat and a browning of the meat. These are still within the legal selling age of the meat but not as fresh as you would like.

As for size, you can cook any size brisket you want to, assuming you have the space on the pit to hold the brisket. Briskets usually run from 8 pounds up to 14 pounds for the typical store briskets. You may find some small ones in the 6 to 7 pound range and you may even see some big ones in the 16 to 17 pound range. I like my briskets to be right around 12 pounds each. These seem to work better and are not so big that they take forever to cook. Usually this size brisket is easy enough to find.

2. Fat side up or down when you cook a brisket.

This is a frequently asked question and stirs up some debate in the BBQ community. When you look at the brisket you will notice one side of the brisket is covered almost totally by fat. The other side of the brisket is not covered by solid fat but has a more marbled look to it. The non-fat side, if you will, also is the side that the point of the brisket reaches its highest point.

Now for the discussion. When you place your brisket on your cooker do you cook with the fat side on top or on bottom? Letís discuss this and then decide.

The conventional approach to cooking any meat on the cooker is to place the fat side of the piece of meat on top. This thinking is driven by the belief that as the meat cooks and the fat begins to break down, the juices of the fat will help marinate the meat as it cooks. This is true with most of the meat we cook. I have no problem with the thought process here. So one vote for placing the fat side of the brisket on top.

Think about a couple of other issues when we cook meat low and slow. Where does the heat we are using come from, the top or bottom of our cooker? That is right the heat source is always at the bottom of the meat. This is true if we cook in the oven, a grill, or a smoker. And we all know that heat rises. So the deal is to have the heat come from the bottom and rise over the food we are cooking.

When you cook, you notice that regardless of the meat we are cooking and regardless of the type of cooker we are using, that when our meat is cooked, and we are serving it, you notice that the bottom (the part of the meat that cooked nearest the heat source) is usually more done than the upper portion of the meat. This makes sense, as the bottom has been closer to the heat source and has been subjected to more heat.

My point is, if we cook with the fat side down on a brisket, we have a barrier of fat protecting the meat from the higher heat source. If we cook fat side up then we have no barrier there to protect the flat portion of the brisket from the higher heat.

If you really study the brisket you will notice there is a layer of fat that runs down the center of the brisket, from a point that begins right after the flat and begins to rise to the point. This flat layer and the fat that runs all thru the brisket will give us plenty of natural juices to keep the meat moist during cooking, if we use a rub that is designed to hold in the meats own juices.

Therefore, I always cook my brisket with the fat side down on the smoker. I want that protection from the heat source. This is even more apparent if you use a grill and donít have a large space between your heat source and the meat itself.

I have asked dozens of brisket cookers at various contest and cook-offs what they prefer. I have read plenty about cooking brisket. There still seems to be about half of those cookers that cook with the fat side up. So the choice is yours here. Try it both ways if you want to but I have cooked both ways for experimental purposes and find that fat side down is by far the best for me.

3.Wrapping a brisket

Another controversial subject matter here. Do you wrap the brisket in aluminum foil during the cooking process or just cook it un-wrapped. Again, I have done brisket using both methods. My personal choice is to wrap a brisket about 2/3 of the way thru the cook. That is to say, if you cook for 12 hours, wrap the brisket at around 8 hours. If you cook for 18 hours, then wrap around the 12-hour mark.

At the Houston Rodeo Cook Off I wanted to test the differences in wrapped and un-wrapped brisket. Three days of cooking brisket will allow you the time to do some playing and experimenting. So I cooked some brisket wrapped and some unwrapped in the same batch of brisket. My results indicated that the wrapped brisket was juicier, more tender, and had an even better flavor than the un-wrapped brisket.

With wrapping the brisket you do a couple of things. You first preserve the juices that normally are dropping from the brisket inside the aluminum and they assist in keeping the brisket juicy in the latter stages of cooking. Remember, your brisket has been cooking for a long time and retaining some liquid inside of the aluminum helps self marinate the meat. I use a BBQ sauce (the recipe is in the recipes you received when you signed up for the newsletter) to put over the brisket when I wrap it up. This adds some flavor and gives the meat some moisture as it finishes cooking. It will also assist in helping bring the internal temp of the brisket up to the 160 degree point so the collagen in the brisket will break down.

Again, there are many who do not wrap a brisket during cooking. I always ask at cook-offs and my unofficial survey would say at least 2/3 of brisket cookers wrap their briskets.

Another side point here, when you unwrap your brisket the juices you have left in the foil are fabulous to add to beans or to a sauce if you are serving one. There is so much flavor in that liquid it is great to use on everything. So use it.

4. How Long and at What Temperature Do I Cook a Brisket

The art of cooking a great brisket involves time and temperature and patience. Low and slow. I cook brisket at 200 degrees for up to 24 hours. Usually the cooking time is around 18 hours, but sometimes weather and cooking situations dictate a longer cook.

Some will say you can cook a brisket in 5 or 6 hours. And yes you can. But you have to raise your temperature to say 275 to 300 degrees to get there. And the meat does not have time to really absorb all of the smoke flavor it will on a longer cook and it does not have time for the collagen to break down completely. So typically these briskets are tough, burned on one side or the other, and dried out. Remember that cooking at temperatures above 225 degrees can boil out the internal juices of the brisket.

If you donít have the time to keep the brisket on the grill or smoker for 18 hours or so you do have an alternate plan. Put your brisket on the grill or smoker and cook it at a low temperature for as long as you can, then simply finish the brisket off in the oven at 200 degrees for the remaining time needed. This way you cook the brisket and break down the collagen completely. You will get the smoke flavor from the grill for the time it is left on there.

Remember, be patient. Donít keep fooling around with the brisket. Every time you open the grill or smoker to peak in you just added more cooking time as the temperature and all that great smoke just went out of the pit.

5. Dried Out and Burned Brisket Ė What Went Wrong?

Well two things have probably lead to this. First, your temperature was way to hot, and second, you cooked the brisket too close to the heat source. These are the typical problems associated with dried out and burned brisket. Too much heat and a brisket is just not very forgiving especially if your brisket is very close to the heat source. Again, cook low temperature for a long time.

To correct the problem move the brisket as far from the heat source as possible and cut down on the temperature you are cooking with. If you have a small off-set cooker the heat coming directly out of the fire box is really hot so move the brisket back as far from the heat as possible and place the brisket with the tip facing the heat source. Get that fat layer on the bottom and that will help protect the meat also.

6. Do You Cook a Flat the Same as a Whole Brisket

The answer here is yes. Donít change up the way you cook a brisket. But the flat will cook much faster than a whole brisket. The flat also does not have a large fat cap to help protect it from the heat. So you really need to cook low and slow for this type of meat and add a rub that will keep the meat moist during cooking.

7. Do you Mop Your Brisket During Cooking

The answer is no. Some use mopping during cooking. Their idea is that mopping a brisket will add juices to the brisket that have been cooked out of the meat and it will also add flavor to the meat. Have you ever tried to add moisture to meat when the meat is hot? What happens? The liquid you are trying to baste with just rolls off the meat. It does not penetrate the meat it simply rolls off. So I personally donít believe mopping accomplishes anything other than to give someone something to do during the long cook process.

And remember, every time you open up the lid of the smoker or grill to mop you just let out all of the moisture, smoke, and heat in the smoker. You just added more cooking time to get to the final product. If it takes you a minute to mop the brisket, it will add 15 more minutes to the cooking time. This seems to be self-defeating.

Add your flavor before the meat goes on the smoker with a great rub. A rub that is also designed to help maintain the moisture inside the meat. A rub that will make cooking a brisket a more enjoyable event for you.

8. Slicing the Brisket

Before you slice the brisket, let it stand and cool down for at least 30 minutes before you begin. It makes the meat easier to cut and lets you maintain perfect slices. Slice the brisket in ľ inch thick slices. Slice across the grain. Start at the flat end and work down from there. The brisket has grains that run in different directions so you will have to move the position of the brisket at times to continue slicing across the gain.

Final Thoughts

OK now get out there and cook that great brisket. Donít be scared to tackle that big old chuck of meat. Go onÖ. You can Do ItÖ

Neil 07-26-2005 04:02 AM

Great post Thilin, thanks.

nucleargeek 07-26-2005 07:43 AM

Great discussion on brisket yet AGAIN!!! I'm a fellow Texan too Judge, and would never even consider injecting a brisket. But, to each his own. There's a Texas way to do brisket, and then there's the wrong way!! JK fellas!

queball 07-26-2005 08:53 AM

Re: RE: Re: Injecting Brisket
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Neil
I've tried to inject brisket but it comes squirting out all over the place!

I wrap the brisket in plastic wrap and then inject. This kind of traps the marinade that escapes. I then place the whole thing in a large zip lock

tommykendall 07-26-2005 09:27 AM

RE: Re: RE: Re: Injecting Brisket
 
I used to use that Dr Pepper marinade religiously. I suppose that 'close' to injecting. No more though - I just dry rub and let 'er rip.

frognot 07-26-2005 10:03 AM

What have y'all injectin' folks been injectin' in that brrisket that y'all like best?

jminion 07-26-2005 10:03 AM

RE: Re: RE: Re: Injecting Brisket
 
The injection that is being used by many out there now days is more than a flavor thing. When the animal is slaughtered and goes into rigor it takes the natural phosphates out of the meat. Fab B replaces those phosphates lost in rigor meaning you increase moisture retension and yield. You will find that shrinkage is much less. This product does have a flavor factor also, it was a factor in the reason for DrBBQ's win in TX on Chris Lilly's show. I talked with Ed Roith and he made it clear that Doc's brisket had much more beef flavor than the other two briskets.

There are a number of Tx cooks I have met that are cooking brisket in high heat short cooks, Johnny Trigg and James Rice are two examples of cooks that use these techniques and win on a regular basis.

Qczar 07-26-2005 10:11 AM

RE: Re: RE: Re: Injecting Brisket
 
I used to try to inject brisket (or any beef product for that matter) and had little luck. Like others, the meat is too dense (in my opinion) and most, if not all, of the marinade will come out imeadiatly. And if any did stay in the meat would leak out shortly after cooking. Poultry of course is fine to inject and pork is so-so. I guess it`s just the density. If any of these meats were cooked properly, injecting really is not needed. JMO.

Now, has anyone used a solid injector? Injecting herbs, garlic, etc,............ Any good? Been wanting one for quite a while, just never seen one in the stores.

The_Kapn 07-26-2005 10:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by frognot
What have y'all injectin' folks been injectin' in that brrisket that y'all like best?

Jim Minion's post gives an excellent answer for that question.

In addition:
I (we) have been using FAB B with Beef Broth for the liquid portion.
Full, rich, natural beef tasting results.
David has some new thoughts that we will be using in the future, but this works fine for now.
A lot of folks use their rub (if it does not have large spice peices in it) cut with broth, water, AJ, Fruit Juices, Carbonated Juices, etc, etc.

FAB P works fine also for pork. All of the above variations are also used with success on pork.

Lots of ways to either enhance or modify the flavor as you desire.
Also adding lots of moisture where it does the most good.

Just some thoughts!

TIM

BBQchef33 07-26-2005 10:47 AM

i didnt care for the Fab B at all. IMO, it changed the flavor of the beef. That may be a good thing to some, but it was just to intense for me. ( Jim, I know. Play for the judges, not myself). i tried injecting a few times with other stuff... jsut didnt seem to make such a difference. Hit the brisket right and take it off on time and it wont be dry.


****Added on edit*****.. i spent the weekend with dave klose a few weeks back. We went to a local butcher and got a prime rib. The beef down there had a totally different flavor from what i get up here.. The only way I can describe it is "beefier". I didnt care for it to much becase it was a little to intense.. this was the same reaction I had to Fab B when i injected it.. now, that may be what alot of people(or judges) like. But what im accoustomed to in the north seems to be different from other places.

Ron_L 07-26-2005 11:02 AM

RE: Re: RE: Re: Injecting Brisket
 
<standing>Hi... I'm Ron

<everyone> Hi Ron!

I'm from Illinois and I inject my Brisket!

<everyone> hushed gasps

It all started a couple of weeks ago when I read a post on "another discussion forum"

<everyone> more hushed gasps

The poster suggested injecting a mixture of beef broth, rub and garlic into a brisket, and I tried it. The resulting brisket was the best I had ever made. Moist, juicy, tender. I've using this mixture two more times with similar results.

What i have been doing is adding a couple of tablespoons of beef rub and two smashed garlic cloves to one can of salt free beef broth. I bring it to a simmer, turn off the heat and let it sit for 30 mins. then I strain and and cool it before injecting.

tommykendall 07-26-2005 12:15 PM

RE: Re: RE: Re: Injecting Brisket
 
Jim - what do you think of pure beef base found at grocers and in spice catalogs? Does this compare to Fab-B? Would it make a good injection product?

Quigley 07-26-2005 12:44 PM

RE: Re: RE: Re: Injecting Brisket
 
ok, call me dense, I still don't understand how you don't get pockets of injection and needle marks. I once injected a turkey with Cajun injection and when I cut into the breast I would cut into pockets filled with spice and herbs. So you say this doesn't happen. I will be trying this out this weekend I quess.

Qczar 07-26-2005 12:53 PM

RE: Re: RE: Re: Injecting Brisket
 
I think you can get pockets of more marinade than others. When injecting however, it is good to pierce the flesh in one spot, and spearing the area in several times thru that one spot before moving on to another area to eliminate many holes in the bird. The thigh can be done with 1 hole. Breast 1 or 2. Etc. Then just hope you got it so it don`t all leak out.

Beef? That`s a b*tch.

chad 07-26-2005 06:18 PM

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: Injecting Brisket
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Quigley
ok, call me dense, I still don't understand how you don't get pockets of injection and needle marks. I once injected a turkey with Cajun injection and when I cut into the breast I would cut into pockets filled with spice and herbs. So you say this doesn't happen. I will be trying this out this weekend I quess.

Guys, it's all about using the right tool and the right technique. Number one on technique is pump it UP - don't skimp. Also, don't use worchestershire, cherry (or any red juice)juice, dark seasonings, etc. These will stain the meat. Don't worry about leakage - but don't blow it out either.

For brisket - inject ALONG the grain (or with the grain) - NOT across it. Really fill up the point and the area under the point where the flat slides up under there.

Then comes tools - the 2 and 4 ounce models are ok but for brisket, butts, turkeys, etc. try this bad boy in the picture. Works like a charm. It'll pump a brisket up like a football and pork butts look like regulation basketballs. It's available from Allied Kenco at www.alliedkenco.com

Now, your mileage may vary - me, I'll inject and see if I can't walk the stage a few times over the next few months.

BrooklynQ 07-26-2005 06:48 PM

RE: Re: RE: Re: Injecting Brisket
 
Quote:

****Added on edit*****.. i spent the weekend with dave klose a few weeks back. We went to a local butcher and got a prime rib. The beef down there had a totally different flavor from what i get up here.. The only way I can describe it is "beefier". I didnt care for it to much becase it was a little to intense.. this was the same reaction I had to Fab B when i injected it.. now, that may be what alot of people(or judges) like. But what im accoustomed to in the north seems to be different from other places.
Ya hit on something here Phil. I read a while back it has to do with how meat is transported thru the US. Apparently the beef in TX, OK, and some of the other southwest states all goes thru oklahoma at some point where the feed changes. I'll see if I can find the article, but that would explain the difference in taste between a TX brisket and a NY brisket.

BigAl 07-29-2005 01:05 AM

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: Injecting Brisket
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by BrooklynQ
Quote:

****Added on edit*****.. i spent the weekend with dave klose a few weeks back. We went to a local butcher and got a prime rib. The beef down there had a totally different flavor from what i get up here.. The only way I can describe it is "beefier". I didnt care for it to much becase it was a little to intense.. this was the same reaction I had to Fab B when i injected it.. now, that may be what alot of people(or judges) like. But what im accoustomed to in the north seems to be different from other places.
Ya hit on something here Phil. I read a while back it has to do with how meat is transported thru the US. Apparently the beef in TX, OK, and some of the other southwest states all goes thru oklahoma at some point where the feed changes. I'll see if I can find the article, but that would explain the difference in taste between a TX brisket and a NY brisket.

When I traveled the country for GE, the best beef I ate was in states where cattle mostly ate corn. It is not so here, beef is tough here because they eat mostly brown weeds.

Neil 07-29-2005 01:56 PM

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: Injecting Brisket
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by tommykendall
Jim - what do you think of pure beef base found at grocers and in spice catalogs? Does this compare to Fab-B? Would it make a good injection product?

My thoughts exactly but I am going to have to give it a try with garlic as Ron suggested.

chad 07-29-2005 02:12 PM

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: Injecting Brisket
 
Beef base is very similar to boullion - look out for the sodium. Other than that it works well for lots of things - I've used it as gravy base a few times when I didn't have real "drippings". And no, it's not Fab-B - you could add Fab-B to the reconstituted base.

jt 07-29-2005 02:36 PM

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: Injecting Brisket
 
3900. Breathe, Chad, Breathe

chad 07-29-2005 02:40 PM

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: Injecting Brisket
 
:D

ckkphoto 07-29-2005 04:49 PM

RE: Re: RE: Re: Injecting Brisket
 
I have cooked a fair number of dry rubbed briskets and injected briskets and brined briskets. the injected and brined briskets win hands down. I actually prefer brined AND injected, but seldom put in the effort. Makes a difference though. As an aside to the fat cap up or down argument, I would like to see the correlation between up/down preference and use of a water pan.

Kevin 07-29-2005 06:43 PM

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: Injecting Brisket
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by BigAl

When I traveled the country for GE, the best beef I ate was in states where cattle mostly ate corn. It is not so here, beef is tough here because they eat mostly brown weeds.

Yep!

I live in farm country. The best beef, or pork for that matter, is the stuff raised for personal eatin, not the product raised for sale to market. Sorry Poo, but that fine eatin stuff in CryOvac comes from somewhere. Corn fed beef is so tender the table knife is not needed for T-bones.

Back on topic. I've got a 12# brisket rubbed for tomorrow's cook and I'm going to inject it with a mix of Jim Beam,Au Jus, garlic powder, butter, and contemplating on Kitchen Bouquet, the flavor is good but it is kind of dark and I don't want to discolor the brisket. Any suggestions?

Kevin

chad 07-29-2005 06:47 PM

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: Injecting Brisket
 
I'd advise against the KBouquet - it is guaranteed to stain the meat - rub the outside before applying rub -- gives a nice start to the bark.

You want your injection to be clear or slightly translucent - in my opinion.

Just my $.02 worth

kcquer 07-30-2005 07:19 AM

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: Injecting Brisket
 
I use one of these

http://www.pbsanimalhealth.com/cgi-l...html?E+scstore

the OL got it for me for Christmas last year. Works like a MoFo!!

Quote:

I'd advise against the KBouquet - it is guaranteed to stain the meat -
I wouldn't use it for a contest, as staining would obviously not be desireable in that situation. At home the staining won't hurt anything and might actually be helpful in that you'll get an indication of how effective you were at distributing the injection.
Quote:

the injected and brined briskets win hands down
I think the benefits of putting your solution both in and around the meat (brisket, butt or whatever) is obvious. If you're gonna take the time to do one, augment it with the other.

Damn, I wanna cook now!!

Kevin 07-30-2005 05:29 PM

Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: Injecting Brisket
 
[quote="Kevin I've got a 12# brisket rubbed for tomorrow's cook and I'm going to inject it with a mix of Jim Beam,Au Jus, garlic powder, butter, and contemplating on Kitchen Bouquet, the flavor is good but it is kind of dark and I don't want to discolor the brisket. Any suggestions?

Kevin[/quote]

Did a little change up on the injection ingredients to avoid the dark color. Used canned beef broth, butter, garlic powder, and bourbon. The brisket turned out beautiful. No tracks or discoloration whatsoever. Tasted great except for the strong alcohol flavor. I quit using wine for cooking years ago because I didn't like the alcohol flavor. Why would I think bourbon would work? Oh well, that's how you learn. The thing was realy good though.

Kevin


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:09 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
2003 -2012 © BBQ-Brethren Inc. All rights reserved. All Content and Flaming Pig Logo are registered and protected under U.S and International Copyright and Trademarks. Content Within this Website Is Property of BBQ Brethren Inc. Reproduction or alteration is strictly prohibited.